"ART RECESSION" PREMIERED AT THE PRESTIGIOUS NEWPORT BEACH FILM FESTIVAL, WON "BEST FEATURE DOCUMENTARY" AT THE RESPECTED INTERNATIONAL FAMILY FESTIVAL, AND IS BEING DIGITALLY RELEASED BY INDUSTRY-LEADING FILMBUFF.

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LOGLINE
“Art Recession” explores the importance of art education and offers powerful ways to save it. 

SYNOPSIS
Despite its huge impact, art education is often one of the first programs to be cut, especially when the economy is hard hit. “Art Recession” explores the importance of art education, showing how it teaches us to communicate, develops our critical thinking skills, helps us to learn other subjects, expresses our individualism, enriches our culture, builds our society, and ultimately conveys our humanity. This documentary then offers powerful ways to save it.

The documentary interviews the art world about this timely subject—from visionary artists and respected art curators to inspiring art teachers and knowledgable museum educators to involved parents and promising art students. These thought-provoking interviews include Gary Baseman, Gary Blackwell, Michelle Borok, Denise Gray, Jason Holley, Brooke Kent, Monica Magana, Rachel Matos, Karol Mora, Eric Nakamura, Paige Oden, Ming Ong, Ralph Opacic, Aaron Smith, Brian Stoebe, Courtney Stoebe, Tiffany Stoebe, Edwin Ushiro, Tianyi Wang, and P. Williams.

When art education is cut, aspiring artists don’t receive the important training that they need to succeed. Students who don’t necessarily want to become artists aren’t exposed to the power of art to enhance their own chosen fields of study. Even pre-school students, who can’t really talk yet, are deprived of a powerful language to express themselves.

To save art education, it’s not as simple as writing your congressman. There must be a fundamental shift in thinking. Art must be valued as highly as reading, writing, and math, if not more. Then more money will be devoted to it. Ultimately, the responsibility to preserve and protect it rests not on just political leaders, art educators, or parents but ourselves as its ultimate benefactors.